Lalwun Naar | Poem | Rasool Mir

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Dearest friend, you go and look out for my beloved,

For my saplings have an inferno to bear.

 

I even looked at tarots for motherhood,

Tied sacred threads in shrines

If the lord doesn’t provide you, you are no good,

For my saplings have an inferno to bear.

 

Out of my home I sneaked,

Alas! It was nightfall just at Neelnaag,

All nights like a wayfarer, I roamed.

For my sapling have an inferno to bear.

 

Mother held me with love sweetest,

Best nourishment did my body get,

That same body now toils in dust,

For my saplings have an inferno to bear.

 

Gaste weisyay, Laal chum dooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwan naar

Domb’e daadai traayem cheerai

Dash mye ganjmai aastaan’an

Yas ne dai dei tas Kate pooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Garre draayas gare’kyan tsooray

Neel naag’ai loosum doh

Raat lajemo raah musaafooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Maaje raechnas khon’ne mastoorai

Aame doad’e seat navnaevnam tann

Sui paan logum metche mozoorai

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Hash’e laeinam zaevij mooray

Pootche tsotnam paekh anzul

Gaseha maalyun su te chum dooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Aes kokil’ah maedaan dooray 

Sua che paraan Allah’hu

Sua che laejmech waalwaash’i dooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Ye Chu Rasul Mir Shahbahdooray 

Tem Chu trovmut aeshq’un dukaan

Yeevu aashiqo, cheyiv toori tooray

Mye Chu mooray lalwun naar

Mother-in-law beat me with whips,

Tore apart the border of my veil,

Would have run back home, but far away it is,

For my sapling have inferno to bear.

 

A bird in some far away forest, is reciting Allah’hu,

She is away, in a trap caught,

For my sapling have an inferno to bear.

 

There is Rasool Mir in shahabaadoor,

He has opened the tavern of love,

Lovers go thee and drink cups full,

For my saplings have an inferno to bear.

 


About the Poet:

Rasool Mir also known as Rasool Mir Shahabadi, was a romantic poet of Kashmir in the 19th century. He was born at Doru Shahabad, a historic town in Anantnag district of Kashmir. He is often referred to as imām-e-ishqiya shairi’ (The epitome of romantic poetry) for his literary contribution to Kashmiri romanticism. Mir was said to have been alive in around 1855 when Mahmood Gami and Soch Kral saeb died. He died a few years before Maqbool Shah Kralawari. Though, Muhammad Y. Taing, in his book ‘Kulliyat-e-Rasul Mir’ mentions of a document from Revenue Department, Anantnag, dated 5 April 1889, acknowledging Rasool Mir as a muqdam (village chieftain, in accord to the agrarian system of Kashmir).

He is one of the most celebrated Kashmiri poets and is popularly called as the John Keats of Kashmir.[4] He formally inaugurated Gazal to Kashmiri poetry